How to Make Pitina Salami: A Step-by-Step Guide

Pitina salami is a traditional Italian cured meatball that is easy to make at home. This charcuterie was born out of necessity in the Friuli region of Italy, where game was abundant and needed to be preserved. Today, pitina salami has become a popular delicacy that is enjoyed by many.

To make pitina salami, you will need a few key ingredients, including pork meat, goat meat, pork belly, and lardo (pork fat). The meat is seasoned with salt, pepper, and red wine, and then rolled into large meatballs. The meatballs are coated in cornflour and then hung to dry for several weeks.

While the process of making pitina salami may seem daunting at first, it is actually quite simple and requires minimal equipment. With a little bit of patience and the right ingredients, you can easily make your own delicious pitina salami at home.

Key Takeaways

  • Pitina salami is a traditional Italian cured meatball that was born out of necessity in the Friuli region of Italy.
  • To make pitina salami, you will need a few key ingredients, including pork meat, goat meat, pork belly, and lardo (pork fat).
  • The process of making pitina salami is simple and requires minimal equipment. With a little bit of patience and the right ingredients, you can easily make your own delicious pitina salami at home.

Piero’s Recipe from the video:

  • 700g Pork Meat Lean (from a Loin of pork)
  • 400g Goat Meat Lean
  • 300g Pork Belly
  • 100g Lardo (Pork Fat)
  • Half glass red wine with garlic and bay leaves inside
  • 40g Sea Salt
  • 5g Ground Black Pepper
  • 1 Teaspoon black peppercorns
  • Cornflower

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History of Pitina Salami

Pitina Salami is a traditional Italian dry-cured meat that originated in the Dolomite valleys of Tramonti di Sopra, Tramonti di Sotto, and the River Cellina, in the northeastern Italian province of Pordenone in Friuli. The origins of this unique salami can be traced back to the 15th century, where it was initially prepared by local butchers as a way to preserve meat during the winter months.

The name “Pitina” is derived from the Friulian word “pit”, which means small, as the salami is typically smaller in size compared to other Italian salamis. The salami is made using lean cuts of pork, which are ground and mixed with spices such as garlic, salt, and pepper. Unlike other salamis, Pitina does not have a casing, and instead, the meat mixture is shaped into small balls and rolled in cornflour.

Over the years, Pitina Salami has become a staple of northern Italian cuisine, and it is widely regarded as one of the most flavorful and unique salamis in the world. The salami’s popularity has spread beyond the Dolomite valleys, and it is now enjoyed throughout Italy and beyond.

Today, Pitina Salami is still made using traditional methods, and it is considered a delicacy in many parts of Italy. The salami’s distinct flavor and texture make it a popular ingredient in a variety of dishes, and it is often served as an appetizer or used as a topping for pizza and pasta dishes.

Ingredients for Pitina Salami

Pitina Salami is an Italian salami that is made without skin. It is a cured meatball that is made by mixing pork, goat meat, and pork fat with various herbs and spices. Here are the ingredients that are commonly used to make Pitina Salami.

Meat Selection

When making Pitina Salami, it is important to choose the right type of meat. Pork meat, especially pork belly, is commonly used to make this salami. Other types of meat that can be used include goat meat, lamb, beef, venison, and game meat. It is important to use lean meat that is free from any visible fat.

Herbs and Spices

To give Pitina Salami its unique flavor, various herbs and spices are used. Garlic, salt, black pepper, fennel, peppercorns, and fennel seeds are some of the most common herbs and spices used. Bay leaves, curing salt, ground black pepper, and red wine are also used to add flavor to the salami.

Additional Ingredients

In addition to meat and herbs, other ingredients are also used to make Pitina Salami. Dextrose is a common ingredient that is used to help ferment the sausage. Cornflour is used to coat the salami and give it a unique texture. Sea salt and black peppercorns are also used to add flavor to the salami.

When making Pitina Salami, it is important to use high-quality ingredients and follow the recipe carefully. With the right ingredients and technique, anyone can make delicious Pitina Salami at home.

Equipment Needed

Making Pitina Salami requires some basic equipment that can be found in most home kitchens. Here are the essential tools and equipment needed:

Meat Grinder

A meat grinder is an essential tool for making Pitina Salami. It is used to grind the meat and mix it with the other ingredients. A manual or electric meat grinder can be used for this purpose.

Refrigerator

A refrigerator is needed to store the meat before and after it is ground. The meat should be kept at a temperature of around 40°F to prevent bacterial growth.

Mixing Bowl

A mixing bowl is needed to mix the ground meat with the other ingredients. A stainless steel mixing bowl is recommended as it is easy to clean and does not retain odors.

Polenta

Polenta is used to coat the meatballs before they are hung to dry. It is a type of cornmeal that is cooked with water or broth to make a thick porridge.

Twine

Twine is used to tie the meatballs together so that they can be hung to dry. Cotton twine is recommended as it does not break easily and does not leave any residue on the meat.

Cheesecloth

Cheesecloth is used to wrap the meatballs before they are hung to dry. It allows air to circulate around the meat while keeping out dust and insects.

Hooks

Hooks are used to hang the meatballs to dry. S-shaped hooks are recommended as they are easy to use and can be hung from a variety of surfaces.

Fridge

A fridge is needed to store the meat before and after it is ground. The meat should be kept at a temperature of around 40°F to prevent bacterial growth.

Overall, making Pitina Salami requires some basic equipment that can be found in most home kitchens. With the right tools and ingredients, anyone can make this delicious Italian salami at home.

Pitina Salami

Preparation Process

Meat Preparation

To make Pitina Salami, the first step is to prepare the meat. The meat used in Pitina Salami is lean pork loin, goat meat, pork belly, and pork fat (lardo). The meat should be trimmed of any excess fat and cut into small pieces for ease of grinding.

It is important to ensure that the meat is at the right temperature before grinding. The meat should be chilled to a temperature of between 32°F and 40°F to prevent the growth of harmful bacteria.

Mixing Ingredients

Once the meat is prepared, the next step is to mix the ingredients. The ingredients include red wine, sea salt, black pepper, ground black peppercorns, and cornflower. The wine and salt start to make the meat inhospitable for bad bacteria to flourish.

In addition, a starter culture for fermenting meat, such as Flavor of Italy, is added to the mixture. This culture contains all of the necessary bacteria to safely and effectively ferment the sausage.

The mixture should also be pH tested to ensure that it is at the correct level for fermentation. The ideal pH range for Pitina Salami is between 5.3 and 5.5.

Forming the Salami Balls

After the ingredients are mixed, the next step is to form the salami balls. The mixture is formed into 4-5 large meatballs, nicely compacted. The meatballs are then rolled in polenta flour to ensure they are fully covered. The polenta will stick to the wet outside of the pitina so make sure it is covered all over.

The salami balls are then placed in a fermentation chamber with a temperature of around 70°F and a relative humidity of around 85%. The salami balls are left to ferment for around 24 hours until they have reached the desired level of fermentation.

Overall, making Pitina Salami requires careful attention to detail and strict adherence to the preparation process. By following the steps outlined above, one can create a delicious and authentic Italian salami that is sure to impress.

Curing and Fermentation

Cold Smoking

Pitina salami is traditionally cold smoked to give it a unique flavor. Cold smoking involves smoking the meat at a temperature below 90°F (32°C) for several hours. This process imparts a smoky flavor to the meat without cooking it. The smoking process also helps to dry the meat, which is important for the curing process.

Fermentation

Fermentation is a crucial step in making pitina salami. During fermentation, bacteria convert the sugars in the meat into lactic acid. This acidification process helps to preserve the meat and gives it a tangy flavor. To start the fermentation process, a starter culture is added to the meat. The starter culture contains beneficial bacteria that help to promote the fermentation process. The temperature and humidity levels must be carefully controlled during fermentation to ensure that the bacteria thrive.

Dry Aging

After fermentation, the meat is dry aged for several weeks. During this time, the meat loses moisture and develops a firmer texture. The temperature and humidity levels must be carefully controlled during dry aging to ensure that the meat does not spoil. The ideal temperature for dry aging is between 55°F (13°C) and 65°F (18°C), with a humidity level of around 75%.

To ensure the best results, it is important to use high-quality ingredients when making pitina salami. The meat should be a mixture of lean and fatty cuts to achieve the desired texture. Curing salts, such as Instacure #1 or #2, are used to help preserve the meat and prevent the growth of bad bacteria. The pH level of the meat should be carefully monitored during the fermentation process to ensure that it is safe to eat.

Overall, making pitina salami requires careful attention to detail and a thorough understanding of the curing and fermentation process. With the right ingredients and techniques, anyone can make delicious pitina salami at home.

Traditional Cooking Methods

Pitina salami is a traditional Italian salume that is typically made with goat or lamb meat. The meat is seasoned with garlic, bay leaves, and red wine before being rolled into meatballs and coated with polenta. The salami is then hung to dry for several weeks until it is firm and ready to be served.

Serving with Polenta

Pitina salami is traditionally served with polenta, a dish made from boiled cornmeal. The polenta is typically served hot and topped with a generous amount of grated Parmesan cheese. The creamy texture of the polenta pairs well with the rich, savory flavor of the salami, making for a delicious and satisfying meal.

Charcuterie Preparation

Pitina salami is a type of charcuterie, which is a branch of cooking that involves curing and preserving meat. Charcuterie is a popular culinary trend that has gained popularity in recent years, with many people making their own cured meats at home.

To make Pitina salami at home, it is important to use fresh, high-quality meat and to follow traditional cooking methods. The meat should be seasoned with garlic, bay leaves, and red wine before being rolled into meatballs and coated with polenta. The salami should then be hung to dry in a cool, dry place for several weeks until it is firm and ready to be served.

Cooking with an Italian provides an easy-to-follow video tutorial on how to make Pitina salami at home. The video takes viewers through the entire process step-by-step, from preparing the meat to hanging the salami to dry. The video also includes helpful tips and tricks for making the perfect Pitina salami.

In conclusion, making Pitina salami is a traditional Italian culinary art that requires patience, skill, and attention to detail. By following traditional cooking methods and using fresh, high-quality ingredients, anyone can make delicious Pitina salami at home.

Frequently Asked Questions

What are some alternative casings for homemade salami?

Some alternative casings for homemade salami include collagen casings, fibrous casings, and even natural casings made from animal intestines. Collagen casings are made from animal collagen and are easy to use, while fibrous casings are made from a combination of paper and food-grade polymers. Natural casings are more traditional and provide a unique texture to the salami.

How can I make salami without using nitrates?

Salami can be made without using nitrates by using a starter culture that contains acid-producing bacteria. These bacteria help to lower the pH of the meat, which inhibits the growth of harmful bacteria. Additionally, using high-quality meat and keeping the salami at the correct temperature and humidity levels can also help to prevent the growth of harmful bacteria.

What is the typical fermentation time for salami?

The typical fermentation time for salami can vary depending on the recipe and the desired flavor profile. Generally, salami is fermented for anywhere from 12 to 48 hours. During this time, the starter culture helps to lower the pH of the meat and develop the characteristic tangy flavor of salami.

What is the traditional process for making Italian dry salami?

The traditional process for making Italian dry salami involves grinding high-quality pork meat, adding salt, spices, and a starter culture, and stuffing the mixture into natural casings. The salami is then fermented and dried for several weeks to several months, depending on the desired texture and flavor. During the drying process, the salami develops a complex flavor and a firm texture.

What part of the pig is used to make salami?

Salami can be made from any part of the pig, but the most common cuts used are the shoulder, belly, and leg. These cuts are high in fat and provide the necessary flavor and texture for making salami.

Do you need to cook chicken salami before eating?

Chicken salami should be cooked before eating to ensure that it is safe to consume. Unlike traditional pork salami, chicken salami does not have the same natural preservatives and is more susceptible to bacterial growth. Cooking the chicken salami to an internal temperature of 165°F (74°C) will ensure that any harmful bacteria are destroyed.

Do you have other How to Make Salami Videos?

Yes! we do, here is a list:
How to Make Italian Garlic Salami
How to Make your own Beer Stick
Salame a Punta di Coltello. The Best Knife Diced Salami

Do you have any other videos? Yes here are our latest ones:

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Cooking With An Italian

Ciao I am Piero coming all the way from Puglia Italy. I created this site to bring my love of food to all, hope you enjoy.